Kids Are Grown,

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Transcript

Transcript – Episode 63 – How To Develop The 5 Habits To Live Happier Longer – With Molly Watts

Alice Agnello:

Hello, Molly. Thank you so much for being a part of the podcast today. I really do appreciate it.

Molly Watts:

Hey, Alice, so great to be here.

Alice Agnello:

Tell my listeners a little bit about yourself and who you are.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. My name is Molly Watts and I am the, I guess, default CEO and Founder of Five for Life and also the host of the Live Happier Longer Podcast. I am, just like you, I am a woman of mid-life and a few years ago, I realized that I wanted to try to do something to help people make a difference and live a life that I really saw lived out by my dad. My dad just turned 92 and, at the time, he was just approaching 90, so really, he's still very active, very with it cognitively, physically, and he's just got an air of optimism that he's always had. I really wanted to figure out, okay, is there something that he's doing? Kind of like, whatever juice he's drinking, I want to drink it, too.

Molly Watts:

When I really looked into it and looked at his life, and he's not had a trouble-free life at all. He's had five major heart procedures, he's had prostate cancer, but he's done it all and he's still here, and he's still ticking, and he's still, like I said, has an air of optimism. That's kind of where it started and, yeah, from there, Five for Life was born.

Alice Agnello:

It's interesting because my mom and I have talked about this, about how my two grandmothers lived complete opposite towards the end of their-

Molly Watts:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Alice Agnello:

Between just their attitudes, too, when they got into their 80s, and I try and, I always say, “I want to be like my dad's mother.” She just had this spark and she knew if she at least walked one mile or five minutes on her treadmill every morning, that was going to help her.

Molly Watts:

Right.

Alice Agnello:

My other grandmother had a completely different attitude about aging, so I will shy… and my mother has said to me, “If I say anything or turn into my mother, you can tell me that I'm being like her.” That is the ultimate weapon that I know I'm never going to use, hopefully, to my mom, because it would be, she's going to really take that to heart in a big, huge way.

Alice Agnello:

Today, we're going to talk about the five habits that Molly has developed that are proven to increase longevity and improve overall happiness. They are move, learn, share, give, and let go. From what you were saying about what you learned from your dad, you created these habits to basically live longer, but also live longer and be happy at the same time.

Molly Watts:

Yeah, it's kind of a double… it's a win/win because the idea isn't to just get there, but we'd like to be happy about it once we do. This, also, what's great about everything that we talk about is that you're going to get happier in the moment, too, so that's the whole idea. It's like, getting happier, and then living longer. Yeah, and what really started, like I said, as an analysis of my dad's life because he was my role model. He was the guy that I was like, okay, and sort of like you. I had the opposite side bearing out with my mother, so I was watching my parents take two very different paths, had taken two very different paths towards aging and I just realized, I want to do it like he did and avoid doing it like she did. Right?

Molly Watts:

Yeah, so I looked at his life and tried to figure out, okay, what does he do, what habits does he have that are really producing this outcome, and have produced this outcome? Then, is there any science behind it, is there anything that actually… is he just lucky, did he just… and it turns out that no, actually, the things that he has done, whether he did it… he did some of it very deliberately. He had a massive heart attack when he was 50, should have died, so he had very much one of those moments in life where you got to make some changes. Some of them came about very deliberately because of that and then, some of them just became something that I think was a part of his life that he's always done maybe, and they became more pronounced as he got older. Again, he still does all of this.

Molly Watts:

What I also wanted, was I wanted to figure out if there were things that I could still be doing in my 80s and 90s because that's a big part of it, too. You don't want to just… it's not like, okay, you can stop once you get there. It's a continuous process, so they have to be things that are manageable over time ad sustainable over time. Like I said, so we started looking at my dad. You mentioned your grandmother and she wanted to get on the treadmill for a mile a day and daily habit number one is move. We often say that it's number one for a reason. Number one, and I've never really said this out loud, but yes, my dad, because he had that massive heart attack, one of the first things that was a part of his protocol before he even had the heart attack was getting more exercise. He was a superintendent of schools, he had a very stressful job, he was busy all the time, and he hadn't been taking care of himself.

Molly Watts:

Move has so many benefits to us physically, psychologically, and if it's good for our hearts, it's good for our brains. I mean, for offsets of dementia and Alzheimer's, but for people that are getting older, one of the most important things about moving is it's actually preventative for helping people not lose their mobility, which is something that is probably one of the top fears. We often say that, too. The first three of our five daily habits really offset the fears that people have about getting older, so loss of mobility is just a huge one. Moving, and it doesn't have to be running, it doesn't have to be CrossFit, it doesn't have to be a big ordeal. You don't have to sweat, honestly, you don't have to. Any time you do and if you increase your heart rate, it's going to be, again, it's going to be even better for your heart, but the bottom line is, is that even in cultures where exercise isn't like, getting on the treadmill isn't something that they do, the organic movement that they have every day, the fact that you're out gardening and washing clothes and baking by stirring things by hand, things like that, that organic movement is a way of continuing to just move.

Molly Watts:

I don't know if you've heard this, but I know a lot of people have, that sitting is the new smoking. It's just this is how we can offset that and moving every single day, no matter how much, and just making sure that you're making a mental habit doing it is daily habit number one. Like I said, it's number one for a reason and it's going to make you feel better. It makes you feel happier right away.

Alice Agnello:

I've noticed that even with the stay at home order and coronavirus and how it's changed my habits in a huge way. Then, because I used to go to my workout class three days a week in the morning and that's when I got out and did stuff. Because we switched to online and over Zoom, it's different. It's still moving, but it's different then it's not the full. Plus, then, I injured my back, so then I was out for three weeks and wasn't moving as much as I did. Just even not moving, so I wasn't sitting, I was more sitting, standing, and laying down and just trying to rotate through those three things, I've noticed a huge… in my energy level and, yeah, my brain chemistry and how I'm not as happy right now. It's because I know, I know it's because I'm not moving as much and trying to get back to that.

Alice Agnello:

My dad has always said, “I want to get to 80 with quality.” He has finally embraced, he's actually going to yoga, which just shocked the you know what out of my mom and I, but he's going. He and my mom take walks every single morning because he's very much a hermit. I mean, if my mom was not around, I worry that he's not going to get out and move, but I think he sees the positives now and understands why he needs to do it for the long run.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. Well, and like I said, it's one of those things that is actually, if you continue to move, you should not lose your mobility, make it impossible for you to walk, but walking is just the one of the best… the best. I've done a couple of podcasts on that, but walking is literally the very best exercise and the very best way to move for the long run. Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

As you said, it doesn't have to be a lot. You just have to just start because as you said-

Molly Watts:

Just start, yeah, starting.

Alice Agnello:

… people are on their phones and the TV, they're at home. There's a lot… or they just don't want to get out. They don't want to change their habits that have been ingrained for over 10, 15, 20 years.

Molly Watts:

Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

Yeah, as you said, I'm 47 now and I look at… I could live another 40 years. I could.

Molly Watts:

Oh, yeah. You probably will.

Alice Agnello:

Right. With my long genes in my family, I've warned my husband, I have long genes, so I could be around until a hundred years old. He's like, “Okay, I don't think I'll live that long,” and I'm like, “That's why I want to live, as you said, with quality.” Then, number two is learn and, of course, I love to learn, but tell me why this is important.

Molly Watts:

Well, it's actually, again, it's proven. It came down very naturally for me because, as I mentioned, my dad was a superintendent of schools, so education and learning has just been a part of my life from the get-go and his life for his whole entire career, but it's really about life-long learning and that notion of use it or lose it. It's really applicable to the brain and what neuroscience has learned, even since just in the 2000s, what we're learning about the brain is incredible and how much the things that we used to think about it, or that science used to hold true, just aren't.

Molly Watts:

One of the things that people used to believe was that there was a finite set of… you came out and your brain was… there was a finite amount of its gray matter and you couldn't impact that. At a certain age, you started to lose it. That's what scientists believed. We now know that's not true and you can actually increase your neural pathways and add neurons and brain cells even right up until your last dying days. The way you do it is by learning new things and using your brain to challenge it. It's an incredible organ, the human brain is so advanced and so much different and has evolved in ways that animal brains have not. I just think it's one of those incredible, wonderful gifts of being a human that we cannot understate, we can't take for granted. It is proven to prevent cognitive decline, to prevent dementia and can even… there's been studies that say that it can prevent Alzheimer's. Not necessarily the physical signs, the physical brain manifestations of the Alzheimer's, but the symptoms. Really, that's what you want.

Molly Watts:

There's a very popular study called The Nun Study and the nuns, tracked nuns for several years and these nuns are daily readers. They read a lot, a voluminous amount of books. When they died, they donated their brains to science and what they found was a vast… many of these nuns had the physical markers of Alzheimer's and they weren't showing any of the symptoms.

Alice Agnello:

Wow.

Molly Watts:

It was very much linked to their lifestyle and the use of… and reading. It's just, let's take that off the table, most of us won't go down the path of Alzheimer's but many people fear the whole just senior moments, losing their marbles, just cognitive decline in general and it's 100% something that we can impact and influence simply by using our brains and continuing to grow and learn. My dad learned to play the organ in his 80s. That was something that was a new thing, so I just think that it's… The world that we live in today has made it so incredibly easy to learn something new every day that… we've got the internet, we've got wonderful, so many different content delivery systems in terms of different networks on TV that are documentaries. We've got podcasts, we've got audiobooks, we've just got everything at our fingertips and it's simply that, as you can see, I'm very passionate about learning because I love it, too, but it's just, it's so easy. There's really no excuse for people not to be able to learn something and use their brains and continue to grow their neuro pathways as they age.

Alice Agnello:

What I love about right now is there is a way to learn how you learn best now. Maybe it used to be just either reading a book, maybe watching VHS tape if you're able to find them, or maybe going to a lecture at a college if they offered open lectures for everyone to go, but now, with the internet, I mean, there's so much out there that you can see and do and/or if you go to your local library if you don't have internet access, there are ways that you can continue to learn and even learn for free without having to maybe pay for a class to go pick up some new skill that you want to learn. I love that your dad took up to learn how to be… learn the organ. Love that. So great. It's unexpected, one to learn from, too.

Molly Watts:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

Number three is share, so I was curious to understand what you mean by that.

Molly Watts:

Yeah, so share is really all about our connections with our community, with our family, with our friends, and again, another very relevant piece of study these days is that social isolation and loneliness among seniors is increasing morbidity. Some people say it's the new smoking, loneliness and isolation and we say that share, that maintaining connections and staying entrenched in your family, in your lives, in your community, is an important habit. It does get more challenging as people age. They stop working sometimes, and that's just an organic way of having relationships and seeing people. Right? You're not going to the school anymore as moms, you're not dropping off kids, you're not seeing people on a regular basis, so it becomes, just like you said, your dad, hermit. It becomes pretty easy to fall back into that just quieter… and for many people who are introverted, that's just where they're naturally, their happy spot.

It's again, very proven by science that we are… while you may think that you're really an introvert, we are people that are, I mean, our species, we are created for social interaction and also for that philanthropic giving to other people is so important. The Japanese, I think, have a word for it called Ikigai and it means like finding your purpose and there's just really no better way than to say it, than you need that habit and it can be as little as just saying hello to people as you're walking around the neighborhood and talking to your neighbors and staying active. You can volunteer, you can do so much more with your time because maybe you're not working anymore, but it is, has been proven, again, loneliness and isolation. I just believe that you can make a point in your own life, you don't have to wait around for people to call you and to interact with you. You have to, you need to be the master of your own destiny and really take your own life into your own hands and create that habit. If it doesn't come naturally for you, if you feel more introverted, that's okay, but you still have to take steps to interact with people. It can just be as easy as starting with small talk with your barista when you're getting coffee.

Alice Agnello:

Right now, with a lot of women who are transitioning with maybe no kids are at home… well, right now, maybe all the kids are at home, but eventually, they'll go their separate ways.

Molly Watts:

Yes, we hope.

Alice Agnello:

Again, right, exactly, so that, it is, the kids were their reason to get out of the house, they were the reason to go places, to do things. Whether you were a stay at home mom or you could… because that's one thing I see a lot come up is loneliness. I feel lonely, I don't have anything to do and then, there's this switch because you did everything for someone else. Now they have to, as you said, you have to start putting yourself out there in a different way that you're not used to because you have this habit of taking care of the kids and they're, again, the reason you get outside and do things and go to practice or pick them up or go to the school. Then, your social circle gets very small really quickly if you're not willing to go out, try new things. Even, let's just start from the top, start moving, start learning.

Molly Watts:

Right.

Alice Agnello:

When you start doing those two things first-

Molly Watts:

While you're out there, start… yeah. While you're out there, wave to people.

Alice Agnello:

Exactly.

Molly Watts:

Things like that. One of the things that we also see as people age and have to be addressed is that things happen in life. Partners might be lost and suddenly, you've gone from having all those kids home and having your spouse, and then, you might be alone. You really could just be alone. Those changes, again, so your life doesn't end, your life hasn't, you have to start, you have to pick yourself back up and you really have to initiate yourself to go out and make those connections. I mean, you don't have to, but if you want to live a happier, longer life, you really should because it's, again, it's proven by science to not only increase longevity, those people that have those connections live longer, but they live happier as well.

Alice Agnello:

The more that you do it, it's just as they say, it's a muscle. You just have to exercise that social muscle and you keep going and you keep going and you can't take everything so personally. Like, if someone says, “No, I can't right now.” Okay, she said, “No, you can't right now.” Maybe it's another time that that person can say yes to you.

Molly Watts:

Right.

Alice Agnello:

Everyone always seem to turn it inward to themselves and I did something wrong and I didn't live up to someone's expectations. I think women sometimes read way too much into the circumstances that are happening because they're trying to find the justification of why didn't this work out for me in this one, tiny instance.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. Where you have to really manage our minds, it's a daily thing. I didn't put it in my daily habits, but certainly, a daily activity for me.

Alice Agnello:

Definitely. Number four is give.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. Well, gratitude is something I think that just is a part of our culture these days in terms of hearing about it. It's not something that is new to the party in, at least in my system, but it is, again, proven, and proven to increase happiness in the short run and there is actual scientific study of people that are more grateful, live longer as well. I think it's just good practice for all of us, but it really is. It's a little bit… the thing that I think is different and that people don't necessarily appreciate about gratitude is that really, it's dependent upon the expression of it. Whether that's by writing it down, by saying it out loud, but you need to take that extra step. It's not just necessarily noticing things that you're grateful for, but it's the actual act of expression and that's what actually triggers those endorphins being released in the brain and those actual scientific and physical things that happen that do increase longevity and improve overall happiness.

Molly Watts:

We say it's a habit because we wanted people to take the time to express gratitude on a daily basis, whether that, again, be writing it down, saying it out loud, but a little bit more than just noticing around your life what you might be grateful for?

Alice Agnello:

Then, you become in that habit of noticing the good, instead of always noticing the bad and reflecting back and looking at different situations in a different way because you keep exercising and looking at the good and being grateful. Even though I feel this is just not going to be my day today, okay, what's one thing I can say was really good about today or looking forward to tomorrow or something like that.

Molly Watts:

It's 100% the way that your brain works. We have what is called the confirmation bias, so when you're constantly thinking in a negative frame, you will find things to confirm that and it's the opposite as well. When you start to frame your world from a life of gratitude and you do that by practicing the thought and practicing the habit, then suddenly, just as you said, all of a sudden you seem to have this better life. It's like, really nothing has changed. The only thing that has changed is your perspective. It's so important and that's one of the things I talk about. When I say happier, living a happier, longer life, this isn't like suddenly, magically, like just all of your troubles and all of your life circumstances that are challenging are just going to fall away. That isn't realistic. That isn't what happens in life.

Molly Watts:

Life is 50/50 and it's all about how we, as in our own mental space, can maintain an air of optimism as we age and can be happy in the moments when we need to. That's really, it's a resilience that is, again, has been shown in the people that do live happier, longer. I want to say this I've heard; I was going to say it earlier and I forgot, that the Baby Boomers are turning 65 at the rate of 10,000 per day right now. By the year 2035, we will for the first time in history, the people aged 65 and older will outnumber the people age zero to 18 and this, historically in the world. This is not, and certainly here in the United States, this isn't just a problem of person, of individuals. Although, it's very true and it's very real and it is something that, again, you have to take action now, you have to develop these habits now because most of us, so we've got all the Baby Boomers turning 65, the average lifespan at 65 is 19.3 years.

If you reach 65, you are most likely going to see 85 and potentially 90. If you don't think you're going to be the person that's going to make it that long, it's not like… most of us are. Isn't it, and just because of the way that medicine treats people today, again, you will most likely see that number, so you better start now deciding to make a stand and make living that happier, longer life a priority for yourself because if you don't, you're going to get there and it's not going to be very pleasant.

Alice Agnello:

Right, exactly. Then, you're going to have to undo another maybe 20 years of what you just learned-

Molly Watts:

Right exactly.

Alice Agnello:

… to learn something new for the next 20. Why not start now, so you can get even better and ahead of the curve. What you were talking about earlier reminded me of something that happened just yesterday with my son about your mindset and basing it on things is that I always tell my kids to think positively and it's going to be fine. Maybe it's not exactly the way you thought it was going to be, but it will work itself out. I was doing something online and I was saying out loud how it never works out, this doesn't work. I can't remember what I was saying, but my son immediately ran over to me and he's like, “You stop that. That's not how you taught me.” I mean, he literally lit into me and I thought, “Oh, my god. The teacher is now my son.”

Molly Watts:

Exactly, yeah.

Alice Agnello:

I said, “Okay, you're right.” It was really hard for me to say this may not happen how… then, again, of course, the lovely life comes in and whacks you over the head. Of course, it worked out perfectly, exactly how my son wanted it to work out, and he's like, “See, I told you.” I just hugged him and I said, “Thank you for reminding me of what I tell you and I appreciate what you did.” Of course, I'm standing there going, “Oh, I can't believe he just said that to me.”

Alice Agnello:

If we can show what we're doing by changing our daily habits and how we want to live happier, longer, I just also think the effect that it will have on our children, it will show them the example of what you could do in the future as well in order to be, and just live together longer and be good examples-

Molly Watts:

Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

… like my grandmother was for me.

Molly Watts:

Well, and to be honest, I always say that these are habits mostly because in our younger years, we're focused on raising kids and having our careers and doing all that. It is in maybe mid-life, first of all, the light bulb goes on like, oh, shoot, the runway's not everlasting and/or we have some time to get introspective and to look at our own lives and realize we've got time to take care of ourselves. That's why I always say or, typically, I'm talking about the Baby Boomers and the Gen-Xers, but quite honestly, what I talk about our habits that the sooner you start them and the sooner they become part of your life, the better it's going to be because the happiness doesn't come at the end. The happier starts now and then we get to live longer as a part of it. Right?

Alice Agnello:

Right. Exactly. All right, and number five is to let go.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. Right, so we Americans and all over the world, we like to hold onto stress and anger and regret and fears and a lot of those negative emotions actually, again, have been proven to… in this one, it's more that those types of… especially stress, those kinds of negative emotions, if we hold onto them, it does have physical manifestations in our body and they lead to inflammation, which leads to chronic disease. All of the chronic diseases, heart disease, diabetes, talking about diabetes two there, not diabetes one that you develop young, younger person, but diabetes two, cancer, a lot of these… All of the things that are in… high blood pressure. Right? Silent killer. Most of these disease states are caused by chronic inflammation and those can be directly related to that stress process in the body.

Molly Watts:

Letting go is just a… and again, been proven by science also that people that let go of their past regrets and their old angers are psychologically happier. It's not too hard to understand that if you are harboring all of those, but especially as people age, we have a lot of the… we've got more experience behind us and it's very easy to look back at the past and regret decisions that we've made or to be sad that we didn't do something. The people that, as they age, the people that are successful in not harboring that old regret, live that happier, longer life. We don't want to be focused backwards; we always want to be focused forwards and continue to see ourselves as growing and evolving.

Molly Watts:

Old age is not a downhill slide to the end. It can be a upward climb still, and should be, in my opinion. Really letting go is just that. It's, again, so many tools these days to be able to help us, whether it's meditation apps or yoga as your dad is doing, reading, taking a bath, doing things to take to really, and self-care is such a big part of what people talk about, especially these days. During COVID especially, the self-care couldn't be more important, but letting go is something that in the Five for Life planner, and I guess we'll probably talk about that in a minute. There's a space there for writing notes, for writing again, for writing it down and just getting it out, so that you're not just holding it inside.

Alice Agnello:

I've noticed that or lately or the last couple of years, I've noticed more and more articles and studies and different things about how the emotional trauma or what you're holding onto or the stress, the things that aren't really, let's say, tangible, come up in a different way later on. As you said, it could be causing for the heart disease, it could be causing the different cancers or different autoimmune diseases. It's all that the brain and what your chemicals your brain releases due to different emotional responses, can affect you in different ways in long-term and even just the short-term because I've noticed a big difference in my dad with doing yoga. He suffered with PTSD for a number of years and I always think to myself, “If only he had done this sooner, I think he would have felt better in the long run.”

Alice Agnello:

I know from personal experience with my husband, he has Sarcoid and I fully think that when he has flareups now, again, it's an autoimmune disease, but I think there's a lot of flareups when he's stressed. There's like a cause and effect to it and I always keep telling him, just it's fine, let's do some yoga. Let's just try and meditate in a different way. It's hard-

Molly Watts:

It is hard.

Alice Agnello:

… to switch that off.

Molly Watts:

Some people, I know meditation for me is one of those, is a struggle. My brain wants to keep going and it takes a lot of intention and that's something that is a part of this. Everything I talk about, too, it's deciding and it's living the life of intention and having a plan requires that you do things intentionally, but even deep breathing, just breathing. There's been so much science behind that and it doesn't take you too long to experience some real positives just from taking some deep breaths.

Alice Agnello:

Then, yeah, people always think that it's like this, a 20-minute thing I have to do.

Molly Watts:

Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

I mean, just start with five. Just do one.

Molly Watts:

Yeah, exactly.

Alice Agnello:

Just do one minute and see how you feel after that.

Molly Watts:

Right.

Alice Agnello:

It doesn't have to be this big production and buying lots of things. You know what I mean?

Molly Watts:

Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

Just one minute a day and then work yourself up maybe to five. See if you like it. My son's the same way as you. Can't stand yoga. His brain is just… it's just too much for him to do, so he doesn't want to do yoga, but he has started to try and do a little bit of meditation. For him, that's a big step, just even doing that little tiny thing for him every single day.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. For me, journaling is the way that helps me the most and that's why we created the Five for Life planner. It's really a journal.

Alice Agnello:

I was just going to say, yeah, tell me about that.

Molly Watts:

Yeah. It's really just a tool to help people create the habits of the 13-week, undated journal/planner that has basically two pages. On the left side, there's a motivational quote because I love motivational quotes. They start of each day and it really helps us, again, just helps us frame the day in a way. On the left side, there's timed activities, so you can track just what you want to do. Some people use that for more writing space, I think that's great. On the right-hand side are all of those five daily actions, so we've got morning meditation, which is really writing down whether you use it for letting go or for gratitude. Either one works. There's a spot to track your move, whatever that is for the day. The next box, there's actually a little trivia tidbit, a little learning. We make it easy, so you don't even have to go outside of the journal to learn something. There's a little factoid in the middle on the second page. Right below that is a little box for share, which again, is a great way of writing down, just I had coffee with Allison, it was really great to talk to her. I love seeing her.

Molly Watts:

It helps not only embed the memory, but really just, again, practices the gratitude, too. Then, at the bottom is evening reflection and that, again, for either gratitude or letting go, just a little space. At the end of each week, you can track how you did on building those habits, but it's just a way of… it's a habit tracker and it's a way of establishing not only the habits, but keeping track of what you're doing on a daily basis as well.

Alice Agnello:

I love that it's undated, meaning that I start it and then, life happens and I want to restart again, I don't feel like I've somehow missed a couple of weeks because there's a firm date placed on it.

Molly Watts:

Yeah, and you also don't have to wait until the beginning of the month to start either or the next day or whatever it is. You just start. That's… yeah, hopefully, it makes it a little more flexible. Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

No. I love it. Is there anything that I missed today that I should have asked you or anything like that to close it out.

Molly Watts:

No, I just… I often use a phrase that I heard from Rachel Hollis, I think was the speaker, motivational speaker, that I heard it from, but it's, “The quality of our life is equal to the quality of our habits.” I really just hope that your listeners believe that and that they want to focus on habits that are proven to not only help them live longer, but help them live happier because, at the end of the day, while being productive is great, really, longevity is and being happier, is what it's all about, in my opinion.

Alice Agnello:

No, it's fabulous. All right, so then I have my three questions that I ask all my guests. First one up is tell me something that not a lot of people know about you.

Molly Watts:

I'm a fantastic, wonderful Star Wars nerd, so I can play Star Wars trivia with the best of them and I am… my boys, I have four of them, they lovingly call me Yoda because of all of the quotes that I love to instill upon them.

Alice Agnello:

I love that. I love that. I am not an expert, but I love the whole entire… I love it all and I believe my youngest son, I was once Princess Leia in his phone.

Molly Watts:

Oh, yeah, you kind of look like Princess Leia.

Alice Agnello:

Thank you for that. Thank you.

Then, I became birth giver at some point in his life and I said, I'm like, “Can I go back to Princess Leia, please?”

Molly Watts:

I'm not telling my boys that one. I think that they might… yeah.

Alice Agnello:

They would totally switch it, trust me.

Molly Watts:

Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

I'm now birth giver in his phone and I believe my husband was Han Solo for a little while in my son's phone.

Molly Watts:

Nice.

Alice Agnello:

Then, I don't know what he is now anymore.

Molly Watts:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Alice Agnello:

Name three things that you can't live without, other than your friends and family?

Molly Watts:

Oh, let's think about this. Well, the first thing that jumped into my head is pizza, so I guess I'm going to have to just say that one out loud.

Alice Agnello:

Well, who doesn't love pizza? I mean-

Molly Watts:

I know. The second one would be books of all variety. I could not live. I'm typically, these days, am more of an audio books girl, but I love my Kindle, I love hard… I mean, I love regular books. Books would definitely be number two, and number three would have to be the beach, I think. Just being able to go to a beach. I love the ocean, I love the water, and I wouldn't want to not be able to go there.

Alice Agnello:

Love it. If you could choose one song to play every time you entered a room for the rest of your life, what would it be?

Molly Watts:

Well, it would be Happy Together by The Turtles because my husband I played it at our wedding and, of course, that I have a podcast, Live Happier Longer, it kind of feels like it's a part of my life just inherently as well.

Alice Agnello:

It's definitely part of your DNA.

Molly Watts:

Yeah.

Alice Agnello:

I love it. Molly, thank you again for being on the podcast and if anyone wants to find out more about you or look for the planner, how could they do that?

Molly Watts:

Yeah. You can go to… for the planner, you go to Shop.FiveForLife.co, that's Shop.FiveForLife.co, not com, but FiveForLife.co. You can learn all about me. There's a link to the podcast there as well and the podcast you can find on any of your podcast players. It's called Live Happier Longer Podcast and I'm on all social media as Live Happier Longer.

Alice Agnello:

Awesome. Thank you so much, Molly. Appreciate it.

Molly Watts:

No problem. Thanks, Alice. I appreciate it. You guys have a great day.

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The guide will help you:

→  Work on your mindset so you can recognize negative thoughts and work to quiet them.

→  Help figure out what’s bothering you and know it’s okay to go at your own pace.

→ Understand that taking care of yourself is the most important person in your life and to release the guilt.

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